Our Stories

Sukkot Message from Milton

September 23, 2021

Our family has moved quite a bit over the 16 years since our eldest was born. This has been the source of some parental hand-wringing, always wondering and worrying about the balance of taking on meaningful opportunities to serve our Jewish communities professionally while also personally building community for our own family. We have become pros at packing up a condo/apartment/house and unpacking our stuff to quickly make a new house look familiar and like our own. But those things are just symbols of history and home, the true measure is how quickly a place feels like home.

This is not only true for those of us who have physically uprooted ourselves. Finding home can also be a challenge when a community changes over time, leadership turns over, cultures evolve – or we evolve! – and need to reacclimate and adjust to make ourselves at home again.

Each sukkot, we are all meant to experience a bit of this uprootedness and push ourselves to find the deep comfort of truly being home without some of the creature comforts of our houses. It pushes us to find that which we take with us wherever we go – the universal commitments of our lives that make us whole. What are those for your family? For us, as a beginning list, they are fellowship with Jews of all stripes, connection to history and ritual, trusting and being trustworthy, engaging in deep dialogue, and immersion in a community of interdependence (oh, and loyalty to Boston sports teams, of course!).

I do believe this is the essence of what we do at Milton. Our mission and work is to give your children – and your families by extension – access to and a love of these Jewish experiences, feelings, connections, commitments, texts, and songs – which will help them to make a Jewish home wherever they choose to go in their lives, to discover their universals despite the changes around them. While our sukkot may be fleeting, what they can embody and represent is timeless.

MILTON Music Video: A Tribe of Brothers and Sisters / שבט אחים ואחיות

This song, שבט אחים ואחיות (A Tribe of Brothers and Sisters), which was recorded last spring by MILTON community members present and past, embodies these core elements of who we are as a school and what sukkot can mean for all of us. The lyrics are in Hebrew, but I wanted to share a translation of the chorus so everyone can access the message and meaning:

 

Here is home, here’s the heart

And from you I’ll not depart

Our forefathers, our roots

And we are the flowers, the tunes

A tribe of brothers and sisters

 

I hope that the power of its words and the image of so many people coming together will resonate with you and perhaps be sung when you spend time in your sukkah or visit one this week.

May time together with our families and fellows this sukkot help us each find, rediscover, and/or renew our home and our hearts in ways that are rooted, connected and flourishing.

Chag Sameach,

Deborah

Students Prepare to Celebrate